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Registration for spring programs will open in early March 2024.

Concussions/Rowan's Law

Disclaimer

Skate Ontario Concussion Code of Conduct

Concussion Policies

Rowan's Law

Removal From / Return to Sport Protocol

The Rowan's Law Removal-from/Return-to-Sport requirements will come into effect on July 1, 2020. After this date, sport organizations will be required to have a removal-from/return-to-sport protocol

The Return to Sport protocol will be updated in January 2022.

Return_to_Play_Form_October-2016.pdf

Athlete and Parent/Guardian Responsibilities

On July 1, 2020, new rules came into effect through Rowan's Law, to improve concussion safety in amateur competitive sport.

 

A) Athletes and parents of athletes under 18 years of age AND at having at least one (1) STAR 4 assessment

Athletes and parents of athletes under 18 years of age MUST confirm that they have reviewed the Government of Ontario Concussion Awareness Resources and Skate Ontario's Concussion Code of Conduct prior to registration and/or on the first day of skating.

Note: Skaters and their parents who are registered in CanSkate, CanPowerSkate and Star 1-4 programs are exempt from this requirement.


1) Review the age appropriate Concussion Awareness Resource, Both the parent and skater are required to review.

2) Review Skate Ontario's Concussion Code of Conduct. Both the skater and parent are required to review.

3) At the time of registration, you and your skater(s) will be asked to confirm that you have reviewed the age appropriate Awareness Resources and the Skate Ontario Concussion Code of Conduct by accepting an electronic acknowledgement.

a) Concussion Policy Acknowledgement - Skaters

b) Concussion Policy Acknowledgement  - Parents/Legal Guardians

 

B) Athletes 19 to 26 years of age AND having at least one (1) STAR 4 assessment.

Athletes MUST confirm that they have reviewed the Government of Ontario Concussion Awareness Resources and Skate Ontario's Concussion Code of Conduct prior to registration and/or on the first day of skating.

Note: Skaters and their parents who are registered in CanSkate, CanPowerSkate and Star 1-4 programs are exempt from this requirement.


1) Review the age appropriate Concussion Awareness Resource, 

2) Review Skate Ontario's Concussion Code of Conduct. 

3) At the time of registration, you (the skater) will be asked to confirm that you have reviewed the age appropriate Awareness Resources and the Skate Ontario Concussion Code of Conduct by accepting an electronic acknowledgement.

a) Concussion Policy Acknowledgement - Skaters

 

C) Involved in more than one sport?

No matter how many sport organizations you register with in a given year, you are only required to review a Concussion Awareness Resource once within that year. You are however required to confirm your review of a Concussion Awareness Resource with each sport organization with which you register.

You are also required to both review and confirm your review of the Concussion Code of Conduct for each sport organization with which you register.

Concussion Information

What is a concussion?

A concussion is a brain injury. It can’t be seen on X-rays, CT scans or MRIs. It may affect the way a person thinks, feels and acts.

Any blow to the head, face or neck may cause a concussion. A concussion may also be caused by a blow to the body if the force of the blow causes the brain to move around inside the skull. A concussion can happen to anyone – anywhere – including:

  • at home, school or your workplace
  • following a car, bike or pedestrian accident
  • from participating in games, sports or other physical activity

A concussion is a serious injury. While the effects are typically short-term, a concussion can lead to long-lasting symptoms and even long-term effects.

What are the signs and symptoms of a concussion?

Everyone can help recognize a possible concussion if they know what to look for. A person with a concussion might have any of the signs or symptoms listed below. They might show up right away or hours, or even days later. Just one sign or symptom is enough to suspect a concussion. Most people with a concussion do not lose consciousness.

Common signs and symptoms:

Physical

  • Headache
  • Pressure in the head
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Blurred vision
  • Sensitivity to light or sound
  • Ringing in the ears
  • Balance problems
  • Tired or low energy
  • Drowsiness
  • “Don’t feel right”

Sleep-related

  • Sleeping more or less than usual
  • Having a hard time falling asleep

Cognitive (Thinking)

  • Not thinking clearly
  • Slower thinking
  • Feeling confused
  • Problems concentrating
  • Problems remembering

Emotional

  • Irritability (easily upset or angered)
  • Depression
  • Sadness
  • Nervous or anxious

Red Flags

“Red flags” may mean the person has a more serious injury. Treat red flags as an emergency and call 911.

Red flags include:

  • Neck pain or tenderness
  • Double vision
  • Weakness or tingling in arms or legs
  • Severe or increasing headache
  • Seizure or convulsion
  • Loss of consciousness (knocked out)
  • Vomiting more than once
  • Increasingly restless, agitated or aggressive
  • Getting more and more confused

What steps should I follow if someone I know, or myself, is suspected of having a concussion?

Follow these three steps if you — or someone you know — experiences a blow to the head, face, neck or body and you suspect a concussion. Call 911 if you are concerned the injury is life-threatening, such as the person is unconscious or they had a seizure.

  1. Recognize signs and symptoms of a concussion and remove yourself or the athlete from the sport/physical activity, even if you feel OK or they insist they are OK.
  2. Get yourself or the athlete checked out by a physician or nurse practitioner.
  3. Support gradual return to school and sport.

These resources are not intended to provide medical advice relating to health care. For advice on health care for concussion symptoms, please consult with a physician or nurse practitioner.